From Garlic Mustard to Japanese Stiltgrass: Non-Native Invasive ID and Control, Mar. 14th

A Talk by Patrick Whitehouse, Fairfax County Park Authority
Green Spring Gardens
4603 Green Spring Road, Alexandria, VA 22312
Thursday, March 14
7:30 – 9 pm

VNPS programs are free and open to the public.
No reservations are necessary for lectures
FMN members: Earn one hour CE

Invasive plants are non-native species that degrade our natural ecosystems. They can tolerate a wide range of habitats, generate many offspring, mature quickly and spread. They out-compete native species, reducing or eliminating them. This can lead to fewer native birds and wildlife.

Please join the Potowmack Chapter of the Virginia Native Plant Society for a talk by Patrick Whitehouse, an ecologist for the Resource Management Division for the Fairfax County Park Authority (FCPA) who will discuss non-native plant identification and control, as well as information on the Invasive Management Program at Fairfax County Park Authority. Patrick has worked for the FCPA first as a naturalist, then as an ecologist, earning his bachelor’s degree in Forest Management from West Virginia University.

Habitat restoration such as the Invasive Management Area (IMA) project can support the success of native plant species. The IMA Project began in 2006 and now manages more than 35 acres in Fairfax County. The Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) program is another county effort that finds new invasive species through surveys, then eradicates them before they cause harm. This data on invasive species is tracked across the county. Fairfax County offers many resources about invasive plants to the general public including a pamphlet entitled Invasive Forest Plants
https://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/parks/sites/parks/files/assets/documents/naturalcultural/invasive%20forest%20plants%20brochure.pdf

and a booklet entitled, Non-native invasive ID and control https://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/parks/sites/parks/files/assets/documents/naturalcultural/non-native-invasive-id-control-booklet.pdf

Native Plants: Advancing Our Dialogue with Nature, March 30th

U.S. National Arboretum Visitor Center, Washington, D.C.

Main gate by the visitor center is 2400 R Street NE, which will bring you to the R Street gate- use this address for GPS directions

8:30 am – 3:30 pm

Fee $95 ($76 for Friends of the National Arboretum members).  More information and register here.

Learn to look at cues from nature, whether it is pinpointing the best grasses and sedges to control storm water or combining natives to reduce maintenance.
Hear about newly discovered native species, visit an Arboretum restoration project, discover how pesky invasives can help produce alluring art, or learn about plants toughing it out in some unexpected places.

Talk Topics/Speakers 

LOOKING to NATURE for BEAUTY with LESS MAINTENANCE
C. Colston Burrell, principal,  Native Landscape Design and Restoration,

THE NEW WORKHORSES of the GARDEN: Native Grasses & Sedges
Shannon Currey, marketing director, Hoffman Nursery

TWO SIGNATURE NATIVES: Leather Flower & Wake-robins
Dr.Aaron Floden, botanist, Missouri Botanical Garden.

Concurrent sessions:

ALIEN WEEDS: Art from an Insistent Abundance
Patterson Clark, senior graphics editor, Politico Pro

SPRINGHOUSE RUN RESTORATION
Max Fedeli & Angela Magnan, staff, U.S. National Arboretum

FINDING NATURE in ALL the WRONG PLACES
Dr. Brett McMillan, science teacher, The Bryn Mawr School of Baltimore

Native plant sale: 8:30 to 1 pm.

Apply for Summer internship to support Heritage Habitat by March 15

It’s an age-old dilemma. College graduates get their diplomas and apply for their first jobs only to find that most jobs require experience. But how do you get experience if no one will hire you?

Virginia Cooperative Extension internships give you the opportunity to explore careers in nutrition, agriculture, environmental science, natural resources, family and consumer sciences or community and youth development. And you get paid.

This summer, the National Park Service, Virginia Cooperative Extension, and Virginia Department of Forestry are jointly sponsoring a summer internship to support the Heritage Habitat project.

Major responsibilities will include field-work, program development & delivery on the Manassas Battlefield National Park and the Conway Robinson State Forest in support of the Heritage Habitat Trails program, a LEAF site in cooperation with Virginia Master Naturalists.

This 12-week internship pays $12/hour. Applications due March 15.

For more information contact: 

Adam Downing (540) 948-6881 adowning@vt.edu
Bryan Gorsira (703) 754-1861 bryan_gorsira@nps.gov
Sarah Parmelee (540) 347-6358 sarah.parmelee@dof.virginia.gov 

Pull additional details from the flyer

Green Breakfast, Mar. 9th

Brion’s Grille – 10621 Braddock Rd, Fairfax, VA 22032
Saturday, 9 March 2019
Breakfast begins at 8:30 am, $10 at the door, cash preferred.
No prior registration required.

(Part One) How to Avoid Being Bad, When You’re Trying to Do Good!*
Brandy Mueller, Environmental Compliance Coordinator, Fairfax County Land Development Services

Even the most well-intentioned conservation efforts can sometimes lead to unexpected challenges, when necessary permissions are not received or limits pushed…even those in our own backyards. When we only see the end vision of our projects and backyard or community conservation retreats, we don’t often think of them as land-disturbing activities, certainly not in the same vein as traditional development. But, they can be. A little planning ahead and a general understanding the rules and regulations that are in place and why they exist can help to make your projects great successes.

This is part one of a series of breakfasts in which Brandy Mueller, Environmental Compliance Coordinator with Fairfax County’s Land Development Services will provide a brief overview of the current program and share the vision for the future. Ms. Mueller will discuss some logistics for filing complaints and resources and information that are available online. The complaint response program is undergoing changes in 2019 and Ms. Mueller is interested in your ideas about other information and resources that you may need to support individual and community projects to help make them a success.

Later in 2019, Ms. Mueller will be back to share the lessons-learned and describe updates to the program.

Breakfast includes an all-you-can eat hot buffet with fresh fruit and coffee, tea, orange juice or water. No prior registration required. If you have any questions, please contact the Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District at conservationdistrict@fairfaxcounty.gov.

  • This program was originally scheduled for the 12 January 2019 Green Breakfast.

Prince William Master Gardener Vegetable Gardening Series, Feb 16, 23 & Mar 2

Haymarket-Gainesville Library
14870 Lightner Rd, Haymarket, VA 20169
Saturdays, 16 & 23 Feb and 2 Mar 2019
10:15am-1:15pm

Growing our own food, using nature as a guide and incorporating sustainable practices is good for our bodies and good for the earth. This series of 3 classes cover the essential topics — planning the garden, using organic sustainable techniques to develop healthy productive gardens, and growing good garden soil. These practices are on display at the Prince William Master Gardener Teaching Garden in Bristow and showcased in their Saturday in the Garden programs. Taught by the Master Gardener Cook’s Garden Team. This is a free program, but please register by email or call 703-792-7747.

Helping your stream through citizen science

Chapman DeMary Trail, Purcellville VA
Sunday, 10 March 2019
2-5 pm

Join Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy for a stream-side demonstration and discussion examining how citizen science surveys can be used to assess local stream quality. You will see how biomonitoring surveys are conducted. You will have a chance to look at the data and at aquatic macro invertebrates. They will discuss how the data is analyzed and how it can be used to improve our streams. At the end, you will have the opportunity to sign up for a spring survey, led by one of Loudoun Wildlife’s citizen science stream monitoring teams. Registration is limited, RSVP to Loudoun Wildlife.

How Recycling Works in Fairfax County, Feb 12th

Thompson Center

6090 Kingstowne Village Parkway, Alexandria, VA 22315

Tuesday, 12 February 2019

7:30 pm

Join Fairfax County Recycling Coordinator Erica Carter as she shares what happens to our recyclables after they’re picked up from our curb and what we can do to reduce the amount of trash we produce. Sponsored by the Kingstowne Cares Conservation Club. View the event on Facebook or Nextdoor.

Hear Mike Bishop on bluebirds, Feb 26

Learn about local efforts to bring back the Eastern Bluebird from Master Naturalist and Virginia Bluebird Society’s 2017 Bluebird of the Year Mike Bishop. He’ll discuss history and recent grassroots efforts to revive populations in Virginia.

Sully Government Center

4900 Stonecroft Blvd, Chantilly, VA

February 26, 7.30-8.30 pm

Admission is free and families are welcome

Approved for continuing education credit for FMN members

Stream Monitoring, Feb. 9th to Mar. 16th

Prince William (Hooes Run) Water Quality Monitoring Workshop
When: Saturday, 9 February 2019, 10 am-12:30 pm
Where: Castle Ct., Woodbridge VA
Join Veronica Tangiri of Prince William SWCD in monitoring this beautiful site of Hooes Run as it enters the Occoquan Reservior/River area. Chemical and biological data will be collected. Visitors parking lot and curb parking available. Contact Veronica for more information or to register.

Holmes Run Stream Monitoring Workshop
When: Saturday, 16 February 2019, 10 am-12:30 pm
Where: Roundtree Park, Falls Church VA
Join the Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District (NVSWCD) as they discover aquatic life in Holmes Run! This official NVSWCD stream monitoring workshop covers watershed health, what macroinvertebrates tell us about stream quality, and what you can do to prevent pollution in your local stream. This workshop will also help to prepare you to become a certified stream monitor. Registration is limited. Send questions to Ashley Palmer and RSVP here.

Pohick Creek Stream Monitoring Session
When: Saturday, 16 February 2019, 1 – 4 pm
Where: Hidden Pond Nature Center, Springfield VA
Join certified stream monitor Susan Demsko in her winter stream monitoring at her site at Hidden Pond Nature Center. Registration is limited. Contact Susan for more information or to register.

Little Difficult Run Stream Monitoring Workshop
When: Saturday, 23 February 2019, 10 am-12:30 pm
Where: Fred Crabtree Park, Herndon VA
Join the Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District (NVSWCD) as they discover aquatic life in Little Difficult Run! This official NVSWCD stream monitoring workshop covers watershed health, what macroinvertebrates tell us about stream quality, and what you can do to prevent pollution in your local stream. This workshop will also help to prepare you to become a certified stream monitor. Registration is limited. Send questions to Ashley Palmer and RSVP here.

Bryan Branch Stream Monitoring Session
When: Saturday, 23 February 2019, 1 -3 pm
Where: McLean VA
Join a certified stream monitor at this adopted stream to help make a difference in our environment. We will check on the health of one local stream in McLean. County and state officials will use the data you collect to assess the overall condition of our streams and help determine watershed management initiatives. Come learn more and help. Registration is limited. RSVP to Elizabeth Winston.

Holmes Run Stream Monitoring Session
When: Sunday, 24 February 2019, 9 am-12 pm
Where: Near Annandale Road, Falls Church VA
Join certified stream monitor Valerie Bertha in her winter stream monitoring at her site in Holmes Run. Registration is limited. Contact Valerie for more information or to register.

Friends of Accotink Creek Stream Monitoring Session
When: Saturday, 9 March 2019, 9:30 – 11:30 am
Where: Lake Accotink Park, Springfield VA
Join Friends of Accotink Creek volunteers as they assess ecological conditions in a stream, based on the presence and absence of bottom-dwelling invertebrates. Meet at the parking lot behind Lake Accotink Park Administrative Building. See additional stream monitoring information on the Friends of Accotink Creek website.

Cub Run Stream Monitoring Workshop
When: Sunday, 10 March 2019, 10 am-12:30 pm
Where: Cub Run Stream Valley Park, Centreville VA
Join the Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District (NVSWCD) as they discover aquatic life in Cub Run! This official NVSWCD stream monitoring workshop covers watershed health, what macroinvertebrates tell us about stream quality, and what you can do to prevent pollution in your local stream. This workshop will also help to prepare you to become a certified stream monitor. Registration is limited. Send questions to Ashley Palmer and RSVP here.

Prince William (Cedar Run) Stream Monitoring Workshop
When: Saturday, 16 March 2019, 10 am-12:30 pm
Where: Evergreen Acres Farm, Hazelwood Dr., Nokesville VA
Join Veronica Tangiri of the Prince William Soil and Water Conservation District for citizen science monitoring. Come and learn more about the health of this stream and how it interacts with agriculture as it joins the Occoquan River. Contact Veronica for more information or to register.

Learn about vernal pools, March 3rd

Mount Vernon Government Center
2511 Parkers Lane, Alexandria VA
Sunday, 3 March 2019
1:30 pm, social gathering, 2 pm program

Vernal pools, which are pools that dry up in the summer, are vital habitat for salamanders, fairy shrimp and several species of frogs. Vernal pools occur throughout the Washington area and play an important role in the environment.

Karen Sheffield, the Manager of Huntley Meadows Park, will present this program on vernal pools. She will discuss the animals and plants that inhabit these shallow pools of water. The program is brought to you by the Friends of Dyke Marsh and cosponsored by the Friends of Mason Neck State Park, the Friends of Huntley Meadows Park and the Friends of Accotink Creek.