Posts

Help Control Invasive Plants with the Friends of Dyke Marsh, February 4th & 18th and March 4th & 18th

Photo: Courtesy of National Park Service, Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve 

Saturdays, February 4 and 18 and March 4 and 18, 2023
10:00 AM

Meet at the Haul Road Trail entrance bulletin board.
GPS coordinates: 38.777739, -77.050540

Directions:
South of Alexandria off the GW Memorial Parkway at
the sign for Dyke Marsh Nature Preserve and Belle Haven Marina,
turn east onto the road toward the Potomac River. Take the first
left and park in the Belle Haven Park lot. Walk back to the marina
road and turn east, toward the river. Walk 30 yards. On your right
is a Dyke Marsh sign and the entrance to the Haul Road trail.

Sign up by sending an email to [email protected]

 

Join the Friends of Dyke Marsh at 10 a.m. on these dates and help tackle invasive plants: February 4 and 18 and March 4 and 18.

Meet at the Haul Road Trail entrance bulletin board. Bring water, gloves, hand clippers and a lopper, if you have one. We will supply instructions, examples of targeted plants and trash bags. We will have a few hand clippers and loppers to share. Wear long sleeves and pants and sturdy shoes.

Sign up by sending an email to [email protected] and put “Invasive Plants” in the subject box. Indicate your preferred date(s). We kindly ask that you not bring pets.

Help Control Invasive Plants with the Friends of Dyke Marsh – January, February and March

Photo: Earth Sangha

Join the Friends of Dyke Marsh (FODM) at 10 a.m. on these dates and help tackle invasive plants: January 7 and 16, February 4 and 18 and March 4 and 18.

Meet at the Haul Road Trail entrance bulletin board. Bring water, gloves, hand clippers and a lopper, if you have one. FODM will supply instructions, examples of targeted plants and trash bags. They will have a few hand clippers and loppers to share. Wear long sleeves and pants and sturdy shoes.

Sign up by sending an email to [email protected] and put “Invasive Plants” in the subject box. Indicate your preferred date(s). They kindly ask that you not bring pets.

Help Tackle Invasive Plants with Friends of Dyke Marsh (FODM), July & August

Photo: Janet Quinn, Invasive plants
Saturdays, July 16 and 30, August 13 and 27, 2022
9:00-11:00am

Dyke Marsh, Alexandria
Haul Road Trail directions and parking information – click here.
(GPS coordinates: 38.777739, -77.050540)

For more events and information click here.

Help protect native plants by pulling and clipping invasive plants. FODM will train volunteers to identify the five or so target plants. Sign up by sending an email to [email protected] Put “invasive plants” in the subject box Invasive plants can threaten and outcompete native plants.

Millions of Trees at Risk in Northern Virginia? Introducing Tree Rescuers!

Photo courtesy of Plant NOVA Natives

Northern Virginia’s oldest and best-loved trees are in danger, and the threat is in plain sight – and yet there are few who can see it.

But help is on the way! Tree Rescuers – a new community education and outreach program – is shining a light on non-native invasive vines, which pose a mortal threat to millions of mature trees in Northern Virginia.

More than 130 people from neighborhoods across Northern Virginia have already volunteered with Tree Rescuers, a new campaign sponsored by Plant NOVA Trees and aimed at preserving our area’s mature trees.

“We were amazed at how many people were ready to do something like this for the trees but didn’t know how to get started,” said Margaret Fisher, one of the coordinators of Plant NOVA Trees. “This is a great time to start, since the leaves are down and the vines can be seen more easily.”

As many as three million trees in Northern Virginia may be at risk, said Fisher.

Many people are unaware that invasive vines like English Ivy can eventually make a tree hazardous (and expensive to remove). Tree Rescuers volunteers learn how to identify problematic vines, then walk their neighborhoods spotting trees that need help.

The Tree Rescuers don’t remove any vines themselves, but they warn landowners by dropping off a brochure explaining the problem and ways to fix it.

Data gathered by Tree Rescuers will also help improve knowledge of the actual number of trees at risk, since the collected data is being aggregated and mapped. A map of neighborhoods surveyed can be viewed here.

Tree Rescuers is part of Plant NOVA Trees, a five-year campaign by local governments and nonprofit organizations to increase tree cover in Northern Virginia. Native trees are a key part of the solution to many community problems, from extreme weather and air and water quality to the health of birds, wildlife, and the Chesapeake Bay.

For more details about Tree Rescuers, or to volunteer, click here.

Invasive Plant Identification Walk, April 9th

Photo: Courtesy of the Fairfax County Park Authority

When: Saturday, 04/09/2022 10:00-11:30AM

Where: Ellanor C. Lawrence Park

5040 Walney Road
Chantilly, VA, 20151
Map of Ellanor C. Lawrence Park

Cost: $8.00

Click here for more information.

Register Online.

Event Description:

Identify some Fairfax County’s common invasive plant species. Explore ways to lessen these plants around your home.

Virginia Legislation: Request for Study of the Sale and Use of Invasive Plant Species

Oriental bittersweet vines photo by Beverly Rivera

On January 13, 2021, Virginia Delegate David Bulova offered House Joint Resolution No. 527 to Conduct a Study of the Sale of Invasive Plants.  The resolution notes that “an invasive plant species is a plant that originates outside a region and causes damage to the environment, the economy, and human health after its introduction to a region.”  It further notes that “landscaping with invasive plants causes economic and environmental damage and impinges on the rights of neighbors on whose properties the plants encroach.”  Finally, the resolution sets forth that, “Virginia residents, state agencies, and local governments spend substantial amounts of money each year on the removal of invasive plants, many of which are still being offered for sale in the retail, landscape, greenhouse, and nursery industry, which exacerbates the problem.”

The bill would: 

  • Create a work group with broad representation to conduct a study to examine the following:
    • The sale of invasive plants by all entities;
    • The financial burden of controlling invasives on taxpayers and private citizens;
    • Measures to reduce and eliminate the use of invasive plants and to promote the use of native plants, such as labeling invasive plant species at point of sale, taxing the sale of invasive species, expanding the scope of the current noxious weed list; increasing education and outreach, and increasing use of native plants on local and state government properties.
  • Require the work group to report recommendations by December 1, 2021.

View the complete bill here.  Track the progress of the bill here.

Remember, Master Naturalists, we do not advocate for or against legislation or policy using our master naturalist status.